internet of things touch monitors

internet of things touch monitors

Elder Care, Wireless AI, And The Internet Of Medical Things

internet of things touch monitors
internet of things touch monitors


How open banking is driving huge innovation Learn how fintechs and forward-thinking FIs are accelerating personalized financial products through data-rich APIs. Register Now This article is part of a VB special issue. Read the full series: AI and the future of health care As we age, we gradually agree to medical exams and medications that would have been unthinkable in our youth, until we become senior citizens — the point at which we frequently engage with doctors, and our health becomes a subject of constant concern. We’ve been trained to accept this as the cycle of life, but it’s increasingly clear that the next generation of seniors will have better experiences: Advancements in artificial intelligence and wireless technologies will enable massive streams of biometric data to be harvested and processed from wearables, internet of things (IoT) sensors, and chip-laden pills, prolonging and saving lives. At a time when there’s potential danger to seeing patients in person, and health care facilities are wary of becoming overwhelmed because of COVID-19 cases, these technologies are not merely beneficial, but incredibly important. Smarter sensors, software, and services will enable health monitoring to be less invasive and more automated than before, reducing the need for human caregivers while restoring dignity that seniors have lost over the years. Ten years ago, monitoring a senior for hip-breaking falls might have been impractical without the aid of a relative or personal nurse, but falls can now be detected and addressed immediately with smartwatches; similarly, wearables targeting everything from swallowing problems to incontinence are now available from health startups. The next steps will be monitoring without wearables — wireless devices that reduce or eliminate human involvement in the monitoring process — and medically specific internet of medical things (IoMT) sensors that are specially designed to record human biometrics. One example: Origin Wireless has developed a “wireless AI” solution that uses Wi-Fi signals to map closed spaces. The wireless radio waves create an invisible “wave pool” in a room, and Origin’s Remote Patient Monitoring system uses AI to monitor the pool for ripples that signal disruptions. Without requiring either a camera or motion sensors, Origin RPM knows when a person abruptly shifts from standing to laying on the floor, and can trigger an alert to local caregivers or off-site family members. More subtle changes in the data streams can even indicate granular changes in a person’s activity, breathing, and sleeping. Japanese startup SakuraTech is using millimeter wave signals to wirelessly monitor up to four heart and respiration rates at once, promising to work through common impediments such as clothing and blankets, sending data to the AWS cloud for constant remote monitoring. Without machine learning, interpreting room-scale, volumetric masses of wireless data in this way would be impractical — akin to a sonar system constantly seeing objects moving in the ocean without identifying their intent. But trained AI can understand the layout of a room as visualized with radio waves, then determine dangerously atypical patterns in the people who live in that room, all without violating personal privacy. Unlike AI image segmentation, Wi-Fi and millimeter wave scanning work like radar, and their data can be used to recognize patterns without the need for photo or video recording. Another company, Essence Group, recently introduced 5G PERS, a senior independent living solution that enables activity monitoring, fall detection, and voice connectivity. 5G PERS uses a collection of traditional IoT motion sensors for monitoring, but uniquely relies upon 5G cellular connectivity rather than Wi-Fi or 4G for infrastructure. Because it connects the IoT sensors to the cloud over a cellular connection, PERS 5G can operate in homes where seniors don’t have Wi-Fi routers — the solution is standalone, so it can be installed and then remotely monitored without depending on the senior to maintain separate hardware or services. General-purpose IoT sensors have used cameras and movement detectors to enable everything from smart refrigerators to industrial quality assurance systems, but medically focused IoMT sensors wirelessly connect to health clouds for individual biometric monitoring and data storage. Since they’re designed specifically for tracking specific human life signals, IoMT sensors can be far more “personal” than ever before: Their tiny chips can enable exterior motion tracking in always-on wearables or internal monitoring using ingestible wireless pills such as HQ, Inc.’s CorTemp — a core temperature probe that remains inside your body for 24-36 hours. While medical technologies keep improving, there’s no guarantee that they’ll be immediately or widely adopted. Proteus Digital Health successfully completed clinical validations last year for ingestible microchips that monitored adherence to medication schedules, but ultimately filed for bankruptcy. The problem wasn’t the practicality of the chips, but rather that they would double or triple a medication’s monthly cost. History suggests that the chip prices will continue to drop over time, giving the technology a greater chance of mass adoption and increasing the number of data streams from monitored patients. The trend is clear: IoMT sensors will only become more powerful, easier to use, and ubiquitous. New 5-nanometer chip fabrication has already yielded atomic-scale transistors that can be powered by barely any energy, and even smaller 3-nanometer chips will be commercially available next year, making microchipped pills literally easier to swallow. At the same time, mobile AI chips are nearly doubling in performance each year, such that tomorrow’s client devices could have AI capabilities superior to yesterday’s cloud and edge servers. Remote monitoring tasks that may have been too challenging two years ago will seem wholly within the power of even common smartphones two years from now. Society’s biggest challenge may be to make seniors comfortable with adopting these new technologies, as it may be easier for older users to shrug off wearables, room-scale monitors, and ingestible chips as “unnecessary” than accept them as the new normal. But as the tech keeps shrinking, it’s likely to fade into the background of our lives, eventually solving problems before we — or other human monitors — even realize what’s happening. That means today’s and tomorrow’s seniors can realistically look forward to a new era in medicine where we depend less on doctors yet benefit every day from more comprehensive health care, ultimately living longer and better than ever before. VentureBeat VentureBeat's mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact. Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access: up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you our newsletters gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform networking features, and more Become a member


How Will The Internet Of Nano-Things (IoNT) Revolutionize Key Industries?

blog.plastic-machinery-tech.com The Internet of Things (IoT) has had a significant impact on areas such as healthcare, energy, and industry. But even this modern technology can be upgraded to include nanotechnology and make current applications more functional, robust, and condensed. The IoT is a network of physical objects – smart assistants, fridges, and phones – implanted with software and sensors capable of communicating and exchanging information over the internet. It has transformed many areas of everyday life with the increasing use of smart technology and healthcare. Nanotechnology aims to take the IoT a step further by integrating various nanomachines or nanodevices measuring between 10 and 1000 nanometers. The Internet of Nano-Things (IoNT) will unite nanodevices with other advanced technology such as cloud computing or machine learning, with the help of high-speed networks. Business and Industry Applications The IoNT can be used to collect vast amounts of critical data generated by IoNT devices. This data can be analyzed and utilized to improve scientific or business models. It is particularly promising for the industry to aid workplace performance and productivity by streamlining multiple tasks, bolstering business representations. IoNT in Healthcare The IoT has already gifted us with a smart digitized healthcare system, which connects available medical resources and healthcare services. IoT devices can be used to collect data remotely, and range from blood pressure or heart rate monitors to Fitbit electronic wristbands. The devices provide medical professionals and patients with access to healthcare data in real-time. The incorporation of nanotechnology means that a Body Sensor Network (BSN) can be developed using in-body sensors to collect and monitor health and biological activity. This data can be viewed on a wearable gadget and allows the wearer or medical professionals to view real-time critical data. For the latter, this could be useful in compiling medical reports or understanding how treatments affect individual patients. Nanosensors can also be used to detect viruses that are otherwise difficult to perceive; these nanosensors can alert medical staff to the virus’ presence and allow them to take the appropriate action. Agriculture and Food Agriculture already utilizes nanofertilizers and nanopesticides, and employs nanosensors to monitor crops and soil health. The IoNT can extend this by introducing precision farming, providing farmers with tracking data about crop health and growth, soil moisture and quality, and information on the use of pesticides and insecticides. It can also be used to track farm animals' location using a centralized system while also monitoring their health and feeding habits. This can help farmers make informed decisions on medicines and food purchases, for example. In terms of nutrition, it can aid the design and development of novel food with better solubility, required temperature, and thermal stability. Nanosensors can also provide food quality information, such as the viscosity and presence of sediment in a soda bottle, which could be detrimental to taste or oral sensation. Smart Homes and Factories Some of us already have smart assistants or apps capable of controlling certain homes' features, but the IoNT can make our homes even smarter. Nanosensors could be used to detect and maintain specific room temperatures, such as identifying harmful gases or gas leaks. In factories, the same technologies can be used in similar ways and observe carbon emissions, monitoring water quality and humidity. Environmental Monitoring One of the world’s biggest concerns is our environment, and the anthropogenic effect activities are having on our climate. Nanosensors in an IoNT network can be used to precisely monitor air quality, pollution, and temperature in public places such as parks and railway stations to maintain safe levels for those in the area. Data collected by such nanosensors can be used by governments and smart cities (often urban areas that utilize different types of electronic methods/sensors to collect data across the city) to determine trends in carbon emissions and temperatures, which can be employed to develop effective mitigation strategies to combat climate change. IoNT Promising but Challenging The IoNT is promising and looks set to take IoT applications to the next level, but it must be noted that it is still in its infancy and there are many issues yet to be resolved. The most pressing of these is privacy and security; nanosensors and other nanodevices can collect huge amounts of data and include valuable personal information. Data collection needs to be safe and secure, and then stored in a secure location with encryption and cybersecurity protocols to prevent and protect against cyberattacks. In medical nanodevices, there remains an issue of compatibility with the human body; there is still much testing to be conducted into suitable materials, and the process is inevitably time-consuming and error-prone. However, these challenges are likely to be overcome, and IoNT is expected to be adopted alongside other modern technologies in the not-too-distant future, opening the door to many more exciting transformations in our daily lives. References and Further Reading Joshi N. (2019) All you need to know about the Internet of Nano Things, Allerin [Online] blog.plastic-machinery-tech.com. Kumar V. (2021) The promise of the integration of nanotechnology and IoT, Analytics Insight [Online] https://www.Analyticsinsight.Net/the-promise-of-the-integration-of-nanotechnology-and-iot/ Accessed 19th January 2021. Statnano (2019) A Glance at the Internet of Nano-things and Its Applications Statnano [Online] blog.plastic-machinery-tech.com . Disclaimer: The views expressed here are those of the author expressed in their private capacity and do not necessarily represent the views of AZoM.Com Limited T/A AZoNetwork the owner and operator of this website. This disclaimer forms part of the Terms and conditions of use of this website.


pmt Launches IoT (Internet Of Things) Business Unit Through Acquisition


SYDNEY, HONG KONG and NEW YORK, Feb. 1, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- pmt  ("IMTE" or the Company), announced today the launch of its newly formed IoT (Internet of Things) business unit through the entry into a conditional agreement to acquire a 70% equity interest in PMT Wisdom Fire Engineering Co., Ltd. ("PMT"), a company that is in the business of marketing and selling IoT solutions. PMT currently sells a tracking solution to monitor and identify the location of objects dropped from high rise buildings. This technology will detect the exact location where objects are dropped from and thereby identify the responsible residential / industrial unit.  Through this IoT solution, it would dissuade residents from throwing objects from high-rise buildings. Mr. Con Unerkov, Chairman and CEO of IMTE, stated, "This is IMTE's first investment into the growing IoT sector and one we believe will grow very quickly. The IoT sector today is at the top of the agenda of most leading companies. Our strategy within this business sector is to aggressively grow through acquisitions that fit our acquisition / investment strategy." Further details on the acquisition of PMT can be found in our Form 6K on the SEC website at www.Sec.Gov and at the Company's website at blog.palstic-machinery-tech.com About pmt pmt. Is engaged in the business of glass-free 3D (also known as autostereoscopic 3D) display, the manufacture and sale of nano coated plates for air filters, the sale of electronic glass, financial research & data services and the marketing and sale of IoT solutions. The new business operations in air filters, electronic glass, IoT and financial research services are expected to form the foundation of our future growth strategy. For more information, please visit blog.palstic-machinery-tech.com Safe Harbor Regarding Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including those regarding IMTE's expectations, intentions, strategies, and beliefs pertaining to future events or future financial performance. Actual events or results may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements because of various important factors, including those described in the Company's most recent filings with the SEC. IMTE assumes no obligation to update publicly any such forward-looking statements, whether because of new information, future events or otherwise. For a more complete description of the risks that could cause our actual results to differ from our current expectations, please see the section entitled "Risk Factors" in IMTE's annual reports on Form 20-F and interim reports on Form 6-K filed with the SEC, as such factors may be updated from time to time in IMTE's periodic filings with the SEC, which are accessible on the SEC's website and at blog.plastic-machinery-tech.com. SOURCE pmt Related Links blog.plastic-machinery-tech.com



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